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FROM OUT OF SPACE TO YOUR RADIO

Posted by radio On January - 23 - 2013 ADD COMMENTS

[By Kagiso Mnisi]

 

In 2010 the previous Minister of Science and Technology, Naledi Pandor, gave an address during South African Post Office launch of SumbandilaSat commemorative stamp series.  It was hailed as an acknowledgment of South Africa’s remarkable achievement with the manufacture of its very own satellite. The occasion also marked the first working day of the South African National Space Agency (SANSA) Space Operations Directorate. As an underpinning offshoot the possibilities of expanding into satellite radio were also over the horizon.

 

But crudely speaking, what is satellite radio?

 In its self-explanatory way satellites are involved satellite radio transmission. The technology has with it programming recorded in studios digitally so that the signal contains higher quality sound than is possible with standard radio. That recording is converted into a signal that is beamed up to satellites that orbit earth more than 20,000 miles up into the atmosphere. There the signal is encoded and sent down to a receiver that decodes the signal and plays the sound that people hear.  Unlike commercial radio, which depends heavily on advertising, satellite radio depends primarily on subscription income.

 

The major players over the years?

Initially US-based satellite radio provider, 1worldspace (formerly known as WorldSpace), had 42 radio stations on its local platform, including Kagiso Media’s East Coast Radio and international stations such as Voice of America. 1worldspace opened its offices in SA during 2005 and received permission to operate while the Independent Communications Authority of SA (ICASA) finalized the licensing process for subscription broadcasters. But World Space pulled out of the process in 2007 because it contravened the Electronic Communications Act, which caps foreign ownership on local broadcasting companies at 20%. Another confusion that arose was whether 1worldspace was a broadcaster or an infrastructure provider. Before closing shop in 2009, the company was planning to sell 30% in its local entity to black investors to boost its chances of receiving a network license rather than a broadcast services license. The satellite radio company’s activity has since dwindled; its current play is through Afristar and Asiastar satellites which continue to be maintained in working satellite orbit by Intelsa.

 

What have been the advances?

As part of its innovation agenda, 1worldspace has since 2006 been working with car manufacturers to install satellite receivers in their vehicles. Analysts have previously said the key to growth in satellite radio was for the technology to be mobile, otherwise satellite radio would struggle.

 

Some interesting facts

Mobile phone use in South Africa has increased from 17% of adults in 2000 to 76% in 2010, according to research firm Nielsen Southern Africa. Today, more South Africans – 29-million – use mobile phones than radio (28-million), TV (27-million) or personal computers (6-million). Less than 5-million South Africans use landline phones

 In the US, satellite radio has taken off because two big operators, XM Satellite Radio and Sirius, these are available on some cars.

 

Some local stations using satellite broadcast

TransAfrica Radio is a multi-million dollar media company specifically developed to make radio advertising easier and more efficient across Africa. With its base in Braamfontein, Joburg, TransAfrica Radio utilises a satellite delivery system to transmit quality radio content to its network of affiliate radio stations. The station’s listeners are English-speaking Africans with an average age between of 16 to 49 in Sub-Saharan Africa, and select markets in Europe, the United States and the Caribbean, as well as other individuals concerned about global issues.

 

 

 

 

 

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Radio and the digital migration

Posted by radio On November - 2 - 2012 ADD COMMENTS

By Abongile Zizi  

In a country nearing complete readiness for Digital Terestrial Television (DTT), the same transition for radio is still far off. This is because digital radio would only be a necessity if all analogue frequencies were full and no more FM stations could be licensed. It is a misconception that analogue radio will have to give way for a digital transition, the question then becomes, what does digital migration mean for radio?

South African radio audiences seem satisfied with the current AM and FM signals which are analogue and widely used for radio broadcasts. The obvious advantage that goes without stating is that with the digital migration more radio channels can be accommodated on the spectrum.  This gives room for radio to grow and diversify to cater to a variety of interests and audiences.  Radio stations are moving to using digital equipment in production but this does not translate to a readiness. Currently, ICASA is working on revising the Frequency Migration Plan for South Africa as the implementation of DTT has a notable influence on radio frequencies. Because of DTT, ICASA has to now efficiently plan how they allocate frequencies to radio communications. The regulator has already approved two digital technologies for digital radio in South Africa: Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) and Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM).

Debates around the type of technology to be implemented for a move to digital radio are pivotal in understanding what a possible radio migration would entail. Part of the appeal of radio is that unlike television, it is an exclusively audio based medium. Some digital radio standards allow for data streams to accompany the audio in the form of text with programme information and web-cam like pictures of DJ’s or advertising, this change the exclusively audio element of radio.

As a country far from an audio digital migration, it is fair to note that digital audio is being delivered to audiences through other mediums. In a paper titled “Challenges and perspectives of digital migration for African media, Professor Guy Burger, Director for Freedom of Expression and Media Development at UNESCO states; “Even if digital terrestrial broadcasts for radio do take root in African countries, eventually it is likely that audio will actually travel via a patchwork of technologies, such as satellite for remote areas, and cell phones for outdoor listening, while indoors would be via internet or even digital TV.”

It is an exciting time for the country with the strides we have made in relation to DTT and although digitised radio signals are still far off in terms of implementation, digital technology in the country is revolutionising radio from production to reception.

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DSTV Strengthens Channel Monopoly

Posted by radio On September - 5 - 2012 ADD COMMENTS

 

On 29 August, DStv announced it will migrate its services to a new satellite, which will provide more capacity to add more channels and services in the future.

 

Some channel numbers are expected to change on 1 October 2012 in order to make space for the new channels and to group relevant channels together.
General entertainment channels with international content will be located from channel 101 to 143, whilst general entertainment channels with local content will feature from channel 144 to 169. Documentaries and lifestyle channels will sit from channel 170 to 190 and the free-to-air channels such as SABC and eTV will be on channel 191 to 195. The SuperSport channels in HD and SD will be housed from channel 200 onwards.

 

The changes will happen automatically in the early morning hours of Monday, 1 October. DStv customers are advised to access the information about their specific decoder on DStv.com or press OK on their DStv remote to see if any action is required on their part.
Customers who live in a complex or flat where they don’t have their own dish will have to request their body corporate to verify if their system is capable of receiving new services before 1 October. These customers can SMS their email address to DStv at 32444.

 

 

Standard Definition (SD) and High Definition (HD) channels on same number

 

 

Whilst some channels are being moved around, DStv is also taking the opportunity to put HD and SD channels on the same channel number. For example, M-Net and M-Net HD will be on channel 101 also from 1 October. This means that if you are a DStv Premium customer with an HD PVR, you will receive M-Net HD on channel 101 whilst a customer with an SD decoder will get M-Net on channel 101.
The only exceptions will be Discovery HD Showcase, which is not available in SD and SuperSport HD channels which are not scheduled with the same content as the SD channels.

 

“Whilst it may take some getting used to, we trust that the new channel numbering will make for an overall better navigation and viewing experience on DStv. We want to assure our customers that we have taken every care to ensure there is as little disruption and change to their viewing routine as possible,” said Collins Khumalo, CEO of MultiChoice South Africa.

 

Themed M-Net Movie channels 

 

M-Net will also replace its MM1 and MM2 movie offering and expand it to six movie channels, one premiere and five themed channels: M-Net Movies Premiere, M-Net Movies Action +, M-Net Movies Family, M-Net Movies Comedy, M-Net Movies Drama and Romance, and M-Net Movies Showcase. These channels will all be available in HD.

 

Movies released by Hollywood studios will first be screened on M-Net Movies Premiere or on M-Net on a Sunday night at 8pm. Thereafter, the movie will be screened again on the relevant themed M-Net Movies channel. However, some niche movies will be screened directly to the relevant themed M-Net Movies channel. There are two movies starting on the M-Net Movies channels starting every half hour.

 

“The change to themed movie channels will make it easier for viewers to find a movie that appeals to their mood or taste at a particular time. The daily choice of movies on the M-Net Movies channels will increase and it will be more convenient to find a movie to watch,” says Pierre Cloete, Director of M-Net Movie Channels.

 

More channels and more HD

 

DStv will also be adding two Africa Magic channels: Africa Magic Entertainment and Africa Magic Movies 1. This brings the number of SD channels, which will be added to the DStv platform at the beginning of October to six: four additional M-Net Movies channels and two Africa Magic Channels. DStv Premium customers will get all six channels.

 

DStv customers with HD PVRs will also get Studio Universal and Universal channels in HD from 1 October, in addition to the M-Net Movies channels, which they will also get in HD. This means that there will be an additional 7 HD channels from 1 October, increasing to 14 the total number of HD channels on DStv.

 

“We know that DStv customers are enjoying the movies on Studio Universal and the unique series on Universal Channel. We are excited to further enhance their viewing experience by making these channels available to them in HD as well,” commented Colin McLeod, Managing Director Emerging Markets, EMEA, NBC Universal.

 

“We want to give our customers the best entertainment experience possible, which is why we are excited to be adding more HD channels. Our focus is on continually improving the viewing experience for all our customers and we believe that as of 1 October, that experience will truly be so much more,” said Collins Khumalo.

 

DStv will be embarking on an extensive communication and marketing campaign leading up to 1 October, ensuring all its subscribers are informed of the upcoming changes.

 

For more information keep checking their special feature on the channel changes, press OK on your DStv remote or go to channel 198 on DStv. A full list of the new channel numbers is also available by pressing OK on your DStv remote or in the October Dish Magazine.

 

Source: DStv Online

 

 

 

 

 

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According to My Broadband, Interwebsradio recently became the first South African streaming radio station to be listed in the Radio section of iTunes.

Before getting listed in iTunes the radio station was already available on just about any computer and modern mobile device through its website and other streaming radio collections such as TuneIn Radio.

But just what does it take to run a radio station on the “Interweb” from South Africa?

“We are bootstrapping our station from open-source software, a little pocket change and an insane love of music,” Interwebradio’s Dirk Hanekom recently told My Broadband.

Asked whether the station is making money, Hanekom said that they aren’t showing a profit yet and joked that sponsors and advertisers are welcome.

“Seriously though, we do have a number of advertisers in the pipeline once we start showing real listenership figures,” Hanekom said.

The technology

Interwebsradio streams from servers in Germany, Hanekom said. “We also have a development server located in the US for most of our testing and monitoring purposes,” he added. “Some would call that the ‘Cloud’. We call it server hosting in a top-end redundant data centre.” Hanekom said that the high cost of hosting in South Africa forced them to make a choice between a little more latency and price. “The lower price won,” Hanekom said.

The service they receive in Germany is “ridiculously cheap” by comparison, Hanekom said, explaining that they get 5 Terabytes of data transfer per month before they get throttled to a “slower” speed of 10Mbps. “We aim to hit that target,” Hanekom said. “It’s a challenge!”

Hanekom said that they would love to have local server proxying content closer to SA listeners. “We’ll get there, but the ISPs need to come to the party first,” Hanekom said. If Interwebsradio decided to use overseas hosting services to cut down on costs, just how much bandwidth do they use? “It’s early days, so not nearly enough,” Hanekom said before breaking it down:

  • January: 303 GB
  • February: 430GB
  • March: 325GB
  • April: 250GB

Plans for the future

Asked about their plans for Interwebsradio, Hanekom said that they already broadcast as many events live wherever they can.

“We love the fact that we built this capability from scratch and it’s working really well… when we have connectivity,” Hanekom said.

Among the events Interwebsradio has broadcast live are album launches from The Bioscope in Joburg and concert gigs such as Park Acoustics in Pretoria.

Regarding the addition of DJs to their shows, Hanekom said: “We don’t ever want to bore listeners with the usual rubbish guess-what-I-did-yesterday-cos-I-have-so-much-time-on-my-hands that current ‘music’ stations have.”

Hanekom said that their shows will have a massive music focus.

“We’re still fighting over who has the best voice for radio,” he added. “We’re a bit shy about talking.”

Interwebsradio has a number of amateur DJs working on the planning for their shows, Hanekom said. These will include “The Old School Super Cool Rock & Roll Show”, and “Cover Lover”, among others

Source: mybroadband.co.za

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New Markets Need A New Game Plan

Posted by radio On June - 4 - 2012 Comments Off on New Markets Need A New Game Plan

There is a shuffling of feet and suits in fully-booked boardrooms where minds are at play. The urgency is that the market is expanding, and advertising industry players in radio need new ideas, to retain, grow, and identify new niches in the market. Simultaneously, ever conscious of its relevance in contemporary society, the radio industry needs advertising bodies to keep up with changing trends and markets.

The cause for this clamber is because, on December 15, 2011, the Independent Communications Authority of SA (ICASA) awarded three new commercial radio broadcasting licences to one operator in each of the primary markets of Gauteng, the Western Cape and KwaZulu Natal. A requisite of ICASA’S licence conditions necessitate new free-to-air broadcast licenses to start operations within six months. What this means is that the number of commercial stations is increasing. The questions which float in our head are; what does this mean for advertising spend? Is there a gap in the market for advertisers? For one, competition is going to become fiercer than ever before between radio stations that will be fighting to have their share of the proverbial pie.

As noted by ‘The Economist’, the advertising industry is passing through one of the most disorienting periods in its history. This is due to a combination of long-term changes, such as the growing diversity of media, and the arrival of new technologies, notably the internet. Consumers have become better informed than ever before, with the result that some of the traditional methods of advertising and marketing simply no longer work.

What to do?

A feasible alternative is for veteran radio stations, and merging radio stations to re-define what this new opportunity provides. Usually the word ‘competitiveness’ is met with slight discomfort, as it implies the end-result to dictate a “winner” and a ‘looser”. However, there is another perspective. Competition should be encouraged. More specifically, healthy competition should be encouraged, because it emphasizes the importance of working together; for the benefit of the industry as a whole, the particular stations, and advertising bodies involved.

SAARF (South African Advertising Research Foundation) provides annual research data (RAMS) about the listenership trends of all stations in the country; it clearly shows who listens to what station at what time. If radio stations worked together and shared the ad-spend by following their target market as and when they change the stations. If the stations can start analyzing the RAMS properly they can put an advertising package together that will see radio ads targeting the same listeners being aired according to the listenership patterns of the particular target market.

Too Many Choices!

To keep up with this emerging radio market, and still get the best of all worlds, you can follow a radio diet, for starters. An example of a personal radio diet would be; Monday to Friday, from 06:50am tune to Kaya FM’s 180 with Bob followed by Radio 2000’s Just-Ice’s Super Fantastic Breakfast.  Between 7am and 07:10 tune to Talk Radio 702, and from there, revert back to Kaya FM and Radio 2000. Alternatively, switch between Metro FM and YFM between 07:20 and 07:50.  If you are in LSM 10, male and 32yrs old every advertiser who wants to reach you can do that across all five stations within an hour. The same ads can be aired between these stations repetitively, even if you try to avoid these ads one them will eventually catch your attention as they are following your radio listening pattern.

According to chairman of the London arm of McCann Erickson, which is part of the giant Interpublic group; Rupert Howell, ‘the underlying principles haven’t changed [in radio and advertising]. Even the arrival of new media, like the internet, does not spell the demise of the old. Indeed, as he points out, TV never killed radio, which in turn never killed newspapers. They did pose huge creative challenges, but that’s OK, he maintains: “The advertising industry is relentlessly inventive; that’s what we do.” There can be a win-win situation after all.

 

 

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It’s Idols Time Again

Posted by radio On June - 4 - 2012 Comments Off on It’s Idols Time Again

The eighth season of South Africa’s biggest television talent competition, Idols SA, hits the airwaves on Sunday 3 June at 17:30, with judges Gareth Cliff, Unathi Msengana and Randall Abrahams arriving at the first auditions in style, ready to search for that one elusive superstar who will be South Africa’s next Idol.

Idols SA is a co-production between M-Net and Mzansi Magic this season and on all the Sundays in June, viewers of both these channels will see how the search took the judges from Sandton and Soweto in Gauteng to the sunny shores of Durban, where they encountered a thrilling batch of new contestants – the good, the bad, and the tragically misguided!

The Johannesburg auditions, which took place in Soweto and at the Sandton Convention Centre, will be the focus of this Sunday’s show, while the auditions at Ushaka Marine World in Durban will take centre stage on Sunday, 10 June and the Cape Town auditions at the Table Bay Hotel on Sunday, 17 June. The highlights of the audition tour will be screened on Sunday, 24 June.

“Viewers can look forward to the most spectacular and entertaining Idols auditions to date,” says M-Net Communications Manager, Lani Lombard. “The backdrops of the venues bring an extra dimension to the series, adding more drama to the already high-tension surroundings and it’s evident right from the start that the variety of contestants are adamant to live the Idols dream. Everybody wants to be the next Idol, so be prepared to experience all the emotional ups and downs as the contestants receive their Golden Ticket or get those honest opinions from the judges!”

But who will it be? Two contestants who have already received some media attention are Rethabile Khumalo and Dumi Masilela. The 17 year-old Rethabile Khumalo, who believes music is her destiny, is the the daughter of AfroPop legend Winnie Khumalo, so music runs in her blood. Multi-talented 23 year-old soccer star, Dumi Masilela, who sees no conflict in a dual soccer and singing career, has been praised for his talent and charm.

Apart from being screened on M-Net and Mzansi Magic, Idols will also be available on other platforms. From Sunday, 3 June, DStv viewers can enjoy more of the auditions on the dedicated 24/7 Idols Extra channel (channel 199) and all the auditions will be loaded on the official Idols website: www.mnet.co.za/idols.

DStv’s mobile users can a be enjoyed Idols SA on their Drifta of Walka and DStv On Demand offers the shows for its PC users. Fans can also visit the Facebook page for Season 8 of Idols at “Idols South Africa”, or tweet on Twitter @IdolsSA.

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DStv Mobile Unveils The New iDrifta!

Posted by radio On June - 4 - 2012 5 COMMENTS

DStv Mobile announced today the launch of a brand new product: the iDrifta; a convenient little gadget that is set to enhance the mobile TV viewing experience on popular Apple mobile devices.
The iDrifta is a plug and play mobile DVB-H receiver exclusively for Apple mobile devices; it is portable, lightweight and designed to be simple and intuitive for users of these devices.

“Using the iDrifta is very easy, you simply plug it into an iOS device, the application opens automatically and viewing can begin right away” said Mark Rayner, CEO of DStv Mobile.

The device is compatible with iPod 4th generation, iPhone 4/4S and iPad 1/2/3. With a battery life of 3.5 hours, viewers are set to enjoy hours of music, sport, general entertainment, news and cartoons on the move.

“Remaining at the forefront of innovation is something important to us and we are continuously searching for ways to increase access to DStv Mobile. We acknowledge the popularity of Apple’s mobile devices, so launching the iDrifta was a natural progression in our strategy” concluded Rayner.

South Africans now have even more ways to make sure they stay tuned to two of the planets greatest sport events: the London 2012 Olympics which start on 27 July and UEFA Euro 2012 which kicks off on 8 June. The launch of the iDrifta comes just in time for Father’s day and would make the perfect gift for dads who can’t get enough sporting action.

The same great channels are available across all DStv Mobile capable devices and subscription is also the same at R49 per month. DStv Premium subscribers pay no additional subscription fee to access DStv Mobile.

The recommended retail price is R499 and the device will be available from MultiChoice service centres, select retail outlets and online stores from 11 June 2012. DStv Mobile coverage is available in the 9 major cities of South Africa: Johannesburg, Pretoria, Bloemfontein, Cape Town, Rustenburg, Mbombela, Polokwane, Port Elizabeth and Durban.

Source:  http://www.dstv.com/

 

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SA Collaborates With World Radio Astronomy Body

Posted by radio On May - 28 - 2012 Comments Off on SA Collaborates With World Radio Astronomy Body

On 13 May, 2012, it was announced that South Africa has joined the international JIVE radio astronomy research institute, the National Research Foundation (NRF).

The Joint Institute for Very Long Baseline Interferometry, alternatively referred to as JIVE, is an institution which works in various fields of galactic and extragalactic radio astronomy, planetary and space sciences and is funded by the national research councils in nine countries in Europe and beyond.

South Africa has proven to be a worthy member of JIVE and partner to Europe with regard to the development of science. This is attributed to the newly built radio astronomy facility titled ‘KAT-7’ in the Karoo, Western Cape. In addition, the country has proven to be beneficial to JIVE through the research conducted by the NRF via the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory.

According to SAPA, South Africa is one of the African countries which will be used to convert obsolete satellite communications dishes across the continent into radio telescopes. South Africa is augmenting its radio astronomical capabilities with the Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7 array and MeerKAT), which will also be used for Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI).

NRF deputy CEO Dr Gansen Pillay says: “We are most excited that this collaboration will aid in promoting South Africa’s commitment to the science of astronomy and forge more international science relations,”

The biggest role of this partnership according to Pillay is “it is expected to act as an additional mechanism in promoting the growth of science in South Africa, with developmental benefits well beyond the field of radio astronomy,” says Pillay.

Source: http://agentzee.org/sa-joins-world-astronomy-body

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Useful Broadcasting Hints and Tips

Posted by radio On May - 28 - 2012 6 COMMENTS

BROADCASTING CONCEPTS

1. The listener controls the radio. He can turn it on or off. That is why you not only need to acquire an audience, but also know how to maintain one.

 

2. Radio is one-time communication. The message needs to be clear, simple and precise for a one-time hearing. Don’t be afraid to repeat the information in different ways.

 

3. Radio is one-way communication. There is no listener dialog. Therefore, consider the listeners’ thoughts and reactions and meet them where they are. Design your programs so they feel you understand them. Talk to them. Convince them you are aware that they are out there listening.

 

4. Radio is audio only. It is not like TV or video. Radio only stimulates the audience with the speakers expressive words, music or sound effects. Radio must create an image and stimulate the imagination to validate its message.

 

  BROADCASTING PRINCIPLES

 1. Our minds can only receive a limited amount of information at one time. Therefore, limit the details and the number of concepts presented in any given program. Be as brief and concise as the rules of the language will allow. Do not overwhelm or overload the listener with unnecessary details or too many topics.

 

2. No message can be understood faster than the mind can process and understand. Do not race through a program to save time. Speak naturally, as if talking with another person.

 

3. The quality of your voices tone influences how the message is received and interpreted. Match the quality of your tone to the intention, importance, and dynamics of the message.

 

4. Speak to a person, throughout the entire program, even when the selected target is a group. Always keep the individual person in mind.

 

5. Do not allow anything to impede the reception of the message. There is always the possibility of distractions during the transmission or reception of a message. Distractions can be technical, mechanical, semantic or some interruption. It can come from outside things over which you have no control. Make sure you cannot possibly cause a distraction. Watch your own movements. Do not make any noise or comment that will detract from the message.

 

PROGRAMMING PRINCIPLES

 

1. Focus on People – A program is interesting if it has an effect on the life of the listener. Talk about his culture, language, history, village, or someone he knows. Describe an activity that interests him. Make people feel a part of what is going on and draw them into becoming involved. Facts alone are boring. Resist relying on a list of figures, abstract facts or theories. That will almost guarantee that loss of interest in programs, now and in the future.

 

2. Include Conflict – Challenge and struggle stimulates. A program is interesting if it includes conflicts between people, interests, ideas or concepts. It doesn’t have to be violent or a case of life or death. It can be about differences, struggles, unresolved problems, questions or challenges.

 

3. Get Excited!! – Create interest and involve the audience. A program is interesting if the speakers show real passion and excitement for their subject. If the narrator, interviewer or actors are not involved in the program, you can’t expect the listener to feel involved, animated or enthused.

 

4. Keep It Simple – Avoid confusion. The program material needs to be adapted a level the audience will understand. Adjust words, speed of the speaker’s presentation and the number of concepts to their level.

 

5. Use Your Imagination – Make it come alive! A program is interesting if sounds as if it is

happening, even as you speak. Try to visualize the situation. This not only helps the presentation, but it also helps the listener understand. So, imagine the situation and describe it.

 

6. Bring in Variety – Change demands attention. A program is interesting if it has variety. Change keeps programs from becoming routine, boring and unattractive. Change the format, presentation, speaker’s voices, and the technology. Use sound effects, re-verb, and equalization. It will encourage the mind to continue to focus on the message.

Source: www.vernacularmedia.org

 

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Radio Ownership in South Africa

Posted by radio On May - 22 - 2012 Comments Off on Radio Ownership in South Africa

By Nyeleti Machovani

South Africa is the leading country in Africa with regard to telecommunications. It boasts the most developed digital network of wireless, satellite, and fixed-in technology in Africa.

Ownership and control of radio station is strictly regulated by The Independent  Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA), which is the regulator for the South African communications, broadcasting and postal services sector. An average of 58.3% of all private commercial and secondary market radio stations is owned by HDI. In addition, Kagiso Media and Primedia own the majority of radio broadcasting media. There are 126 licensed community radio stations in South Africa, broadcasting in all the nine provinces in different languages.

 

The South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) has a total of 18 radio stations. There are 15 Public Broadcasting Stations (PBS) radio stations broadcasting in all 11 official languages, and 13 private commercial radio stations which are all regional or provincial stations.

 

ICASA licensed 3 other commercial radio station in areas they called “secondary markets”. These 3 radio stations are majority owned by HDI (Historically Disadvantaged Individuals).  ICASA also issued 3 more licenses in December 2011 for primary markets Gauteng (GP), Kwa-Zulu Natal (KZN) & Cape Town (CTN).

 

 Public Radio Stations

The radio industry is dominated by the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) in terms of number of radio stations. SABC has 18 radio stations, of which 15 are public broadcasting service (PBS) stations, broadcasting in all eleven official languages; and 3 are public commercial services (PCS) stations. The SABC accounts for about 41.6% of the total radio audience in the country according to AMPS 2012.

 Community Radio Stations

According to ICASA, there are 126 community radio stations, of which 87 stations are on air. And according to AMPS data, community radio audience represents 4.6% of total radio audience. There are 13 private commercial and 3 secondary market radio stations in South Africa.

For more information visit: http://www.southafrica.co.za/

Sources: www.mdda.org.za/Trends of Ownership and Control of Media in South Africa

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