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METRO FM MUSIC AWARDS NOMINEES ANNOUNCED

Posted by radio On January - 17 - 2013 ADD COMMENTS

The 2013 METRO FM Music Awards Finalists announcement, was held last night at a cocktail event at Summerplace,  in Johannesburg.

The nominees, the industry and the media were invited to witness which artists have made it as finalists in this year’s awards.  Given the fact that the awards did not take place last November as it is the norm, the Finalists announcement was highly anticipated.  Metro FM being a station that celebrates local music, the guests were entertained by South Africa’s sensation and talented DJ Black Coffee, followed by DJ Ganyani and last but not least, the hilarious, ever colourful and  energetic Dr Malinga.

The MC’s at the event were our very own smooth Wiliam Lehong, The Black Chinese Guy, of the Pyajama Party Show and the ever so classy Azania Mosaka who presents Total Bliss weekdays on METRO FM.  Needless to say they did a sterling job.

The voting lines opened today 17th of January 2013 for the public to vote for their favourite artists to win the most coveted award, a Metro FM Award this year.  Remember to sms category name and favourite artist to 34764.  The voting lines will then close at 11:59 on the 17th of February 2013.

For the full list of finalist visit www.metrofm.co.za/content/news/metro-fm-music-awards-finalists-announcement-2013

Issued by Metro FM

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FINDING REASON

Posted by radio On December - 19 - 2012 ADD COMMENTS

Picture taken from chekadigital.co.za

[By Chloe Smith]

 REASON is a relatively new name in the South African Hip Hop scene. His debut album, Audio 3D, was released in June this year to an enthusiastic local fan-base. The first single, Do It Like I Can, quickly became popular and saw a decent amount of air-time all over the country. Radiobiz caught up with REASON as the debut screening of the video for A LOT ON MY MIND, his latest single.

 So how did you get into the music industry?

Proverb got me in. I played him my music, asked him what he thought of it, he gave me a review and introduced me to a couple of his music-industry friends. And the rest is history.

 Your single “Do It Like I Can” won an award at the South African Hip Hop Awards. How did that feel?

That was quite cool. That was a real honour, truly because I’ve seen the song grow from where it was this time last year. More so because it was recorded three times! The song has grown and come alive and I’ve seen it performed. People look at me funny when I’m performing it with people jumping and screaming. So I’m really excited about that.

 Was not being able to collect your first award as a musician difficult for you?

I think it was a nice story. I kind of felt that it was cool to have somebody go up on stage and say that Reason couldn’t come and accept his award because he’s shooting a video.

 His decision to host the screening of his latest video, A Lot On My Mind, in Newtown was a bold move. Most artists opt for the glamorous, high-end venues, especially when they’re new to the scene and want to make a name for themselves quickly. REASON is just as ambitious as the rest of them but I think that he understands his scene and the people that make up the Hip Hop scene better.

 What was the background behind “A Lot On My Mind”?

There was a lot on my mind at that time in my life. I was broke, my girlfriend wasn’t working, my grandmother was sick so I was going out to drink to forget about it. I was just in that weird space. I also had an album coming out so it was quite an awkward time. So that’s what the song was about – that period in life. But I think for the most part, we put it out as second single because we realised how much people could relate to the song. Everybody’s got a lot on their minds. So that’s why we put it out as the second single. Apart from the fact that it’s a banging song.

 One could say that choosing Kitcheners as the venue communicated an older, more seasoned glamour and style and that by choosing to screen the video there, REASON was linking the underground side of Hip Hop to his single. A bold and clever move – unlike glamorous screenings, no one had any qualms about raising their glasses in the air and grooving the minute A Lot On My Mind came on.

 What was the filming process like for the “A Lot On My Mind” music video?

That was really cool. We were working with Justin from Gorilla Films. He knew what he wanted to shoot; pretty much had all the pictures in his mind. It was a night shoot over two nights and then we banged it out. I didn’t even receive my award because we were shooting.

 Sponsored by Millers, the screening was a definite success, with the crowd jammed into the small space in front of the screens. A sense of camaraderie seemed to fill the comfortable space, as if everyone there knew that you were a lover of Hip Hop, which made you a friend. The beer was cold, the music was loud and the vibe was pumping. Camera flashes illuminated the faces and the old-fashioned wallpaper, chandeliers glinted in the ceilings and somehow everyone seemed to be living only in that moment, as if reality was more real then and the only time was the present. REASON himself milled with the crowd, greeting people and holding conversations in a very relaxed manner. His down-to-earth approach to the night ensured that everyone somehow felt personally connected to him through the event.

 Do you feel that the South African Hip Hop industry is becoming too Americanised?

I think it’s not necessarily Americanised – I think it’s popularised. People are getting to understand the relevance of making music that is actually popular to people. But I think for the most part, it’s really impressive that everybody has their own integrity and they push their own agendas and they push their own perceptions, as opposed to those of the Americans. But trends are trends. There will always be baggy jeans, there will always be American accents and there will always be grills and stuff like that. I think for the most part, when it comes down to the music, as popularised as it may sound, it really is authentic, it really is South African.

Plans for the future?

Music, music, more music. Tours, videos, collaborations, more music, tours, videos, collaborations – just bigger and bigger.

 If you could tour any country in the world, which country would you visit?

I always used to want to go to Jamaica but it seems like everybody is going to Jamaica now. So for now, I’ll say Nigeria.

Why Nigeria?

Because of the stories that I hear, I want to see if it really is that terrible…. but also to get an understanding of their industry. As a musician, we all know that they have one of the strongest and most independent industries in the African continent and it influences us as much as it influences overseas. I think it would be, on a music level, to study how they get to that level where these guys are finding America and they’re opening up Def Jams in Africa. Just to understand how to make things go that big.

 Despite a few technical glitches, the crowd walked away satisfied. REASON even announced that he would play the video twice, because he felt like it and nobody complained. I’m definitely looking forward to seeing more of REASON, more of his music and definitely more of his videos.

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CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF MICASA

Posted by radio On December - 14 - 2012 ADD COMMENTS

After the huge success of their previous 3 music videos, Mi Casa will be releasing their much-anticipated fourth video for their latest radio single, Can’t Get Enough, directed by the well-respected Tristan Holmes from Star Productions.

The video was shot in just over 20 hours and oozes sexiness in its black and white form. The video tells the story of a relationship between a guy (J’Something) and a girl (Model Jennifer Pietersen) – although it’s not your typical boy meets girl scenario. Instead she is completely frozen in ice, a metaphor for the emotional and physical walls she has created around herself. Our romantic hero is able to melt the barriers she has created against him through his unrelenting love for her and through his music. As the ice melts he is able to free her from the ice enabling love to conquer all.

 The single Can’t Get Enough is only available on the recently released THE PLATINUM EDITION version of the groups much acclaimed 2011 debut album, put together personally by the band in order to ‘give something back to the fans’.

The PLATINUM EDITION boasts the full original album with three bonus tracks – acoustic versions of “Heavenly Sent’ and ‘I’ll Be There For You’ and a brand new track, ‘Can’t Get Enough’, already riding airwaves around the country.  There is also a full bonus disc of remixes by producers such as Charles Webster, Atjazz, Gregor Salto, Royal K, QB Smith, Dr Duda and Chymamusique as well as celebrated videos from ‘These Streets’, ‘Heavenly Sent’ and ‘La Vida’.

 This has been a great year for MiCasa after bagging three SAMAs and having just released their Platinum Edition album, the band has spent the better part of 2012 touring both local and internationally, playing up to 12 gigs on some weeks and working the Mi Casa brand into what it is today – a well oiled machine.  

The music video for Can’t Get Enough will be launched on MTV Base: Spanking New O’Clock on Friday 14 December at 16h00.

 Issued by Red Flag

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 [By Kgomotso Moncho]

The SABC Crown Gospel Music Awards took place on the 18 of November at the Durban ICC honouring some of the best artists in gospel music. This annual event takes place in Durban and this year it celebrated “5 Years of grace.”Gospel is a top selling genre in South Africa and these Awards are an attraction in the country’s musical calendar. The Crown Gospel Music Awards have become one of KZN’s flagship events, hosted by the KZN government. They have become so big in their five years of existence that even President Jacob Zuma has become a regular guest. He was absent this time around, but was represented by two of the first ladies. 

Rebecca Malope was the recipient of the Best Gospel TV Show award.

  If you are of the thought that Gospel is a somber and conservative genre, the SABC Crown Gospel Music Awards dispelled this with raucous and explosive performances from the likes of gospel queen, Rebecca Malope and fellow artist from Nigeria, James Okon. Of all the music awards ceremonies in the country, these ones are probably the most collaborative, where the audience is very much part of the show, joining in with every hymn or chorus. And things can get unpredictably joyous. When First lady, Ma Ntuli came on to present an award, the crowd broke out singing ‘Umshini Wam’ for instance.

Reality 7 recipient of the Best Acapella award.

Ntokozo Mbambo and Hlengiwe Mhlaba. Ntokozo won the awards for Best Female and Best Gospel Artist

The role of radio and especially community radio in promoting gospel music was honoured with the Best Gospel Community Radio Show awarded to Thetha FM’s Gospel Tunes and Best Gospel Radio Show awarded to Ligwagwala FM’s Siyadumisa show. Rebecca Malope’s It’s Gospel Time took the award for Best Gospel TV Show.

 The SABC Crown Gospel Music Awards have grown so much so that new categories were added on this year. These include Best Gospel Poetry and Best Gospel Rap taken by Vusumuzi Phakathi and Thabang Byl (of Last Days Fam) respectively, who are forces within their individual and overlapping fields. Adding on to this brand, the founder of this event, Zanele Mbokazi announced that the International Gospel Music Blestival (word play on blessing and festival) would be happening in Durban on December 31 featuring one international act and many of SA’s cream of the Gospel crop. “It’s a date,” she said.

 

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ROYALLY DECREEING THE MUSIC WE LISTEN TO

Posted by radio On November - 16 - 2012 ADD COMMENTS

[By Chloe Smith]

How Copyright Organisations and Royalties affect the Broadcasting Industry of South Africa (Part 1)

The relationship between radio stations and copyright organisations is one that goes back to the beginning of radio in South Africa. How much of what we hear broadcast across the country is dictated by copyright laws and royalties?

Copyright organisations

Copyright organisations have been in existence for the majority of the 20th century. Their main objective is to ensure that the rights of music-creating individuals and all who are associated with the production process are protected. Copyright organisations uphold the copyright laws of South Africa and monitor the payments of royalties to artists, their record labels, their publishers and anyone else that helped to create the album/song.

There are three Copyright Organisations in South Africa. The most popular is SAMRO (South African Music Rights Organisation) but SAMRO also shares the copyright floor with AIRCO (The Association of Independent Record Companies) and RISA (The Recording Industry of South Africa).

SAMRO is recognised as the primary copyrights organisation in the country, representing the interests of the largest number of local artists. AIRCO is a non-profit organisation, which strives to protect the rights of independent artists in South Africa and enable them to be locally and internationally recognised. RISA is dedicated to promoting and safeguarding the interests of local musicians and record companies, working towards an industry that represents the new South Africa.

SAMRO and RISA are both associated with the IFPI (The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry), an international organisation that seeks to monitor copyright laws and associations worldwide. IFPI acts as an umbrella organisation for copyright organisations.

The Berne Convention, an international standard of copyright laws, maintains certain standards to ensure that copyright organisations all over the world approach any and all copyright and royalties issues from an internationally approved standpoint, to best protect musical artists and their works. SAMRO attends the Berne Convention yearly to maintain an internationally recognised standard in South Africa.

 

Local copyright law

Any musical works created in South Africa are automatically copyrighted upon creation and recording. This copyright is valid for a period of fifty years after the music is officially created (this would rely on the time of recording and distribution).

Performing Rights are owned by the author or composer of the musical works. The Public Performance royalties are paid to the copyright organisation, who takes a small administration fee and distributes the royalties accordingly to the composer(s), their publisher and any other organisation, company or individual who has been granted royalties by the composer(s).

Needletime Rights are granted by the original composer(s) of a musical work or their entrusted body of representatives, such as the copyright organisation that they are registered with. This means that any organisation that would like to distribute, broadcast or reproduce this music is then required to pay Needletime Royalties (also known as “pay-per-play”), which are collected by the copyright organisation.

The Performers’ Association of South Africa Trust (POSA) is associated with SAMRO and monitors the Needletime Royalties for any SAMRO member, ensuring that local radio stations are paying the correct amount of royalties to SAMRO for the use of the musical works.

 

International Law

Copyright Organisations in other countries whose members’ musical works have been broadcast in South Africa are associated with local copyright organisations. This means that radio stations pay the royalties due to the local copyright organisation, who then interacts with the copyright organisation in the other country to transfer the royalties to them for distribution.

What it means for radio

The biggest concern with royalties in South Africa is that there is no industry standard. The agreed percentage payable on physical copies of recorded music and the distribution thereof is 5% of the retail price. The royalties payable on the broadcasting of copyrighted music has no official limit or agreed upon percentage, which means that it is completely subjected to whichever agreement is reached between the original composer(s), their recording company and/or their copyright organisation. As there is no standard percentage or fee that all musicians need to adhere to, the royalties on various copyrighted music can vary greatly and contesting any royalties in a court for being excessive can be pointless and reach no satisfactory conclusion.

South African musicians rely on radio stations as a medium of advertising their new music, a source of income and a way to generate CD sales outside of the radio industry. If radio stations can no longer afford to pay the royalties demanded by the copyright organisations or the composer(s), not only will the listenership for that station suffer but the music industry in South Africa as a whole.

Is there a way for the citizens of South Africa to ensure that their radio stations survive without killing the growth of the local music industry? Should there be some sort of agreement among copyright organisations, recording companies and South African composer(s) to ensure that royalties agreed upon follow a standard set of calculations and procedures based on the composer(s) popularity, their CD sales, the revenue brought to the radio stations through the broadcast of their music and any other factors that can prove that the royalties that they demand are deserved?

The validity period of a copyright does provide a loophole for radio stations in that if the musical work was created more than fifty years ago, radio stations do not need to pay royalties on this work. Unfortunately, this loophole applies only to radio stations whose target audience wish to listen to older music and does nothing for radio stations that rely on a younger market for listenership, which means that only a few radio stations can lessen their expenses in this area.

 

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CRASHCARBURN COMES DOWN TO EARTH

Posted by radio On November - 8 - 2012 ADD COMMENTS

[By: Chloe Smith]

 

CrashCarBurn can easily be seen as a local favourite. Formed in England in 2006, the band returned to South Africa in 2007 with an EP to their name and set about distancing themselves from their former band-identity, Tweak.

Band members Garth and Brendan Barnes started Tweak while in high school and quickly became famous among South African teenagers, getting airtime for their songs on radio and being thrown into the underground Hall of Fame headfirst. When Tweak went their separate ways, the Barnes brothers headed to London for a year with CrashCarBurn in mind. “We went from being known everywhere we go to literally playing in empty clubs with maybe one or two people,” said Garth Barnes (lead singer, guitarist and frontman) on stage at their album launch on Tuesday.

Fabian Sing, supposedly residing on their couch at the time, originally acted as their live sound engineer and later joined the band as lead guitarist when Ian Broekhuizen emigrated to Australia. Etienne Janse Van Rensburg (bassist) and Brendan (drummer) had been friends for years – according to Garth, he wasn’t even auditioned for the band. “We just called him up, asked him if he had a bass, asked him if he could play and he was in the band.”

 

Hitting the music scene under a new name with catchy, powerful rock anthems, the band quickly rose above their former levels of fame. CrashCarBurn also became the first South African band to be invited to the Vans Warped Tour, where they played sixteen shows across the East Coast of America and two in Canada, opening them up to an international market. Other tours in Asia and the UK only increased their global fan-base.

 

I had the opportunity of spending a few minutes with CrashCarBurn after their launch for Gravity, their third studio album, on Tuesday night. The launch was unique in more ways than one – the venue was the NuMetro Cinema at Monte Casino, a very comfortable and relaxed way of enjoying a live show. The band also screened a fifteen-minute documentary of behind-the-scenes footage for fans to glimpse a more personal side to the band and its members. The on-screen graphics during performances mirrored the album art, focusing on triangles in an ever-changing slideshow of patterns. The band itself performed incredibly, often sounding the same live as they do recorded, if not better.

 

CS: Thank you so much for giving me a few minutes of your time. I really enjoyed the show. I have to ask – why do they call you Bugsy?

Brendan ‘Bugsy’ Barnes: Bugsy? Embarrassing. When I was small, a little baby, I used to be really fat and my parents called me Bugalug because I kind of bug-a-lug-a-lugged around. And that apparently evolved into Bugsy. It’s not a very rock ‘n roll story.

CS: I really enjoyed the album. You mentioned that it is your most bi-polar album to date. What did you mean by that? Do you mean that you explored new sounds as a band?

Garth Barnes: No, I think what we were trying to get at is that this album has the hardest ever CrashCarBurn songs but also the softest every CrashCarBurn songs. We’ve got Monsters and Angels, which is basically a metal song and then Get Up and Fly, which is straight off an Adele album. And then everything in-between.

CS: On your Facebook page it says that you’re Pop-Punk. What does that mean to you as a band?

Garth: We need to update that. I think we’re more Pop-Rock now, to be honest.

Fabian Sing: Power-Pop.

Brendan:  You know, we make rock music. It’s rock music that’s like pop-music.

Garth: Bit of Hip-hop. You know what, you can call it whatever you want. People always try to put themselves somewhere – are we Indie, are we this, are we whatever. You make music and some people dig it and some people don’t.

Fabian: I think in a broad sense, we would be Pop-Rock.

Brendan: I think Dubstep’s pretty big right now. New album – Dubstep!

CS: So you [Brendan] directed the documentary. Do you do that a lot or is it something that you do occasionally?

Brendan: When I’m not playing in the band, I’m a cinematographer. So I work on a lot of music videos, TV shows, short films, films – stuff like that. Basically, we’ve been filming behind-the-scenes stuff for the last ten years and so we decided well look, we’ve got all this cool footage, let’s put something together. Little bit of a behind-the-scenes insight to who we are. So I got a bunch of my mates that I went to film school with and a friend of mine edited it, another guy did the special effects and it was like a team of close friends put it together. I think it turned out really well.

CS: Do you plan on doing more documentaries?

Brendan: I think it’s a really cool window into the world of the band and that people who listen to the CD like seeing it. So if we have time and cool stuff to show people, we’ll definitely keep doing it.

CS: Did any of you feel that, when showing the documentary to a cinema full of people, footage that you thought was really cool suddenly seemed quite private?

Garth: Yes.

Brendan: There’s more personal stuff than what ended up in the documentary. That was the borderline for how far we could push it. I’ve seen a lot of bands do EPKs that are like, “check us out, we’re really professional and we’re the coolest band you’ve ever seen”. I wanted it to be a little more like, “see all the stuff we’ve done and we are a cool band” but also this is Garth standing naked in Holland and this is Fabian dancing drunk on stage and this is Beth [Etienne] with a hickey on his neck. I wanted it to be something that fans could watch and be like, “cool, these are real guys”. It’s fun to see. Not like, “these guys are unattainable”. Which is all a joke anyway. All of these EPKs that make bands look like super-mad rock stars – I film that and I fake it. None of them are super-mad rock stars so I definitely wanted it to be closer to home so people could really connect.

CS: Did you guys decide to do the show in a cinema after making the documentary or did you want to do a show in a cinema and made a documentary to go with it?

Garth: Chicken and egg.

Brendan: I think the idea to do a documentary/EPK came first and then we thought about the best place for people to hear the album. In album launches, no one knows the songs and it’s more about getting press to actually hear the album. We didn’t want to do it in a sweaty club with bad sound where no one knows what’s going on. So we thought let’s do it in a cinema where the sound will be banging, we can show this awesome documentary on screen and people can sit and actually listen to the music.

CS: Did you enjoy playing your new stuff for the first time?

Garth: Definitely. It’s always scary playing new songs for the first time because you know that there are a bunch of important people there. At the same time, the pressure’s off because no one knows what the songs are supposed to sound like. You can play anything really and people will just say, “wow, that’s an interesting jazz chord that he threw in there” and meantime, it’s a cock-up.

Brendan: I think we did okay.

CrashCarBurn’s latest album Gravity is in stores now.

 

 

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CrashCarBurn… A review of Gravity

Posted by radio On November - 5 - 2012 ADD COMMENTS

[By Chloe Smith]

CrashCarBurn hit the music market with just that. Their new album, Gravity, is described by Garth Barnes as “the most bi-polar album we’ve ever done”. Sticking to their well-known pop-punk sound of before, the album also shows a more heartfelt (and sometimes mellow) side to the band. Gravity is an evolution and maturation of CrashCarBurn without taking away from the rocking sound they were originally known and loved for.

Formed in London in 2006 before returning to South Africa in 2007, CrashCarBurn worked independently for many years. With a few international tours successfully under their belts, the band has continued to remain a local favourite. They recently signed to major international label EMI Music, where they say they “can’t wait to see where this new friendship will take [them]”.

Light, the first single off the new album, quickly became popular on alternative, rock and pop radio stations across the country, lending to their well-known punk-rock/pop-punk sound. With vocals from the locally renowned ChianoSky in Heartbeat Racing, the heart breaking tribute to their dear friend Kerran Yates in Get Up And Fly, the versatility of the album guarantees its good reception. Exploring time signatures, instrumentation and even adding in an orchestra or two, Gravity promises to be a local (and hopefully international) success.

The band can look forward to expanding their audience and their audience can look forward to forming a deeper connection with the band.

Songs to watch out for: The Ride and The Light

Photographed by Bruce K. Cantrell

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SATMA Awards bring glits and glamour to East London

Posted by radio On November - 1 - 2012 ADD COMMENTS

East London in the Eastern Cape was abuzz this past weekend for the first time the South African Traditional Music Achievers Awards took place in the province. At a star studded affair that attracted many traditional music lovers ranging from politicians, traditionalists and SABC TV celebrities.

Local SABC station Umhlobo Wenene FM walked away with two awards for Best Traditional Music Radio Program (PBS) and Best Traditional Radio DJ for Saba Mbixane’s show, Lavutha Ibhayi. Mbixane was also nominated for Best Traditional Radio DJ for PBS and Traditional Music Radio Program, he won both awards.

In other categories, Inanda FM’s Mzothule Shembe walked away with Best Community Radio DJ, Best Traditional and Cultural News Journalist for Print media went Charles Khuzwayo of Isolezwe while Best Traditional and Cultural News Journalist (Electronic Media) went to Sphamandla Goge.

The award ceremony is an all-inclusive annual celebration of South African Traditional Music Achievers with categories ranging from Best Sicathamiya to Best Boeremusiek. The SATMA’s were founded in 2005 in order to uplift honour and promote traditional music and musicians across racial and ethnic backgrounds. Since inception, the SATMA awards were hosted in Kwa-Zulu Natal at the Durban ICC. This year, the event was an equal success after having been moved to the Eastern Cape. This year’s SATMA ambassador was afro pop artist Ntando Bangani who calls the Eastern Cape home.

The awards were hosted in partnership with the Eastern Cape Provincial Government, SABC, National Heritage Council of South Africa (NHC), Ilanga newspaper, Premier Hotels Group and the Buffalo City Metro.

For the full list of winners follow this link: http://www.satmaawards.co.za/docs/Winners%202012.pdf

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A Music Review: Toya Delazy

Posted by radio On July - 23 - 2012 8 COMMENTS

By Nyeleti Machovani

 

Toya Delazy’s talent is undisputed. She embodies all things cool; she is funky, fresh, young, and has such infectious energy. At only 23 years of age, this young songbird has chirped well-enough to wake up South Africa, and get the nation singing along to her catchy beats. Toya Delazy, whose real name is Latoya Buthelezi, and granddaughter to Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi, came to our attention in 2011.

 

As unexpected and seemingly sudden her rise to fame has been, Latoya’s background gives us enough inclination to assume there has been sufficient struggle through the years to make it. Her Sony packaged album titled “Due Drop” which was released in October, 2011, is led by a feisty debut single called “Pump it on”. The airplay this single has received has been tremendous, and the music video packaged for the debut track deserves honorary recognition.

 

The official video for “Pump it on” is currently sitting on 107, 053 YouTube hits, and receiving support from prominent music channels, such as Channel O, MTV Base and TRACE Urban. The second single is titled “Love is in the air” and is also well received by the public; the video has received 33 777 hits on YouTube. Buthelezi describes her album and sound as; “it’s a little bit of everything: jazz, electro, hip hop, pop. I get my bass elements from my jazz background; add some electro keys and my flow is heavily influenced by hip hop. “Pump It On” has all these elements, but it’s still quite poppy”, she says. With such diverse appeal, the former Howard College (University of Kwa-Zulu Natal) jazz student has been embraced both locally and abroad, with listeners often mistaking her slick sound for that of an international act.

 

Due Drop features production from the likes of Jax Panik and Octave Couplet, and collaborations with The Soil and others.  Music critics have on the general scale appreciated that the lass certainly has talent, however condemned this apparently permeating trend to auto-tune, and overly-produce a perfectly good sound for the sake of commercialization. The album is poppy, electro, and very much a dance-album; the lyrics do not offer much depth. The auto-tune is dominant, and this is a distraction to an artist who otherwise, has more to show. The feeling here is, it would be a treat to hear Toya Delazy at her most natural and undeterred, just her voice and piano playing with harmonious melodies. Nonetheless, she had garnered enough supporters to show that there is something she is doing rather well.

 

Buthelezi is as interesting to listen to as she is to look at. Her choice of aesthetic appeal is an array of ensembles rich in multitudes of colours, and textures. She describes her personal style as a mixture of “street and vintage”. All of this is usually adorned by her brand crown of an intricate braided Mohawk and eccentric nerd glasses.

 

The songstress’s future certainly looks as colourful as her style, and the anticipation for more is at its peak. Delazy is South Africa’s latest gem and I certainly am keen for a second album.

 

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Feeling At Home With MiCasa

Posted by radio On June - 4 - 2012 1 COMMENT

By Gaopalelwe Moroane

 

It is difficult, if not almost impossible to wake up in the morning, switch on the radio for a breakfast show and not be greeted by J-Something’s sultry voice, singing, “Good morning to the world out there.” It is even more difficult to not smile or bob your head along to the upbeat tempo of the song. These are the sounds of MiCasa’s award winning single, These Streets, which took South African airwaves, clubs and streets by storm and later went on to win them their  two SAMAs  this year . The album has also followed on to sell double-platinum.

MiCasa, which is made up of the trio, producer and DJ Dr Duda, vocalist J-Something and trumpeter Mo-T, began working together after a random session where the three individuals “free styled” an unrehearsed piece together and blew the crowd away. It’s been love ever since and the airwaves are grateful. The Portuguese–born lead singer, fluent in isiXhosa, is the very good looking Joao, who started calling himself ‘J-Something’ as people could not pronounce his name. He went to school in the Eastern Cape, Grahamstown school, Graeme College and worked on his musical talent when he got involved in the local church as a member of the ‘River of Life’s’ music team. Prior to shooting to fame, as the lead in the group, he sold t-shirts with his brother in Johannesburg.

After the release of the award winning single “These Streets”, MiCasa released Heavenly Sent, which listeners took a liking to almost as much and whose music video was released. It’s a lovely ballad accompanied by a beat that you can’t help but want to dance to, and the ever faithful Mo-T’s trumpet.

MiCasa falls under the successful record label, Soul Candi which is also the home of 5 FM’s Euphonik and Frankie, just to name a few. It therefore comes as no surprise that the trio produced a record of such a high standard.

The album itself consists of fourteen consistently head bopping tracks, and are well deserving of the Best Dance award that they received. My personal favorites on the album are their rendition of the R&B legend, Sade’s Smooth Operator. The only criticism that I found on reviewing the trio’s is that the album isn’t mixed like most dance and house albums are. This however does not take away from the general quality of the album and one can hear why it has been so well received.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Darren Simpson joins KFM

KFM has surprised followers with a major line up remix, including the big news that Darren Simpson will be joining […]

Msizi Shembe joins Metro FM’s Weeked Love Movement

Metro FM listeners are in for a treat this weekend. The station is introducing three new shows as part of […]

Henley Business School launches its own podcast channel #HBR

Henley Business School , last week  announced the launch of a new podcasting channel. #HBR will produce two weekly podcasts, […]

Kaya FM Wine & Malt Whisky Affair 2017 is here!

Kaya FM 95.9 and Old Mutual present two luxurious evenings of the finest wines and malt whiskies for the second […]


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