Google+
Subscribe to: Newsletter      Comments      News

ICASA to hold public hearings on WoWtv application

Posted by radio On October - 26 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (“ICASA”) has given notice to all interested stakeholders that they will hold public hearings in respect of an application from Walking On Water Television (WoWtv) for the authorisation of nineteen (19) video channels and eight (8) radio channels lodged in terms of regulation 3 of the Subscription Broadcasting Services Regulations 2006.

Wowtv logo2

The Authority has received three (3) submissions on this application and scheduled public hearing in that regard.

 

DATE            30 October 2015

VENUE        :  Pinmill Farm, 164 Katherine Street

 

TIME ITEM PRESENTER
09h00 – 09h30 Opening Address ICASA
09h30 – 10h00 Presentation Walking on Water Television (Pty) Ltd
10h00 – 10h30 REPRESENTATIONS Deukom (Pty) Ltd
10h30 – 11h00 Tea Break
11h00 – 12h00 RESPONSES Walking on Water Television (Pty) Ltd
12h00 – 12h30 Question And Answer ICASA
12h30 – 12h35 Closing ICASA

 

Did you like this? Share it:

Digital Migration plan comes under fire from etv

Posted by radio On November - 6 - 2012 ADD COMMENTS

 

On the 1st of November, ICASA held public hearings concerning the proposed frequency migration plan. The plan proposes a large-scale migration of TV broadcasters from the spectrum bands they are assigned as part of the digital migration process. Broadcasters made recommendations in which they addressed some of their concerns.

Although in support of the digital migration, free to air broadcasters like etv have rallied against the proposed changes to the frequency migration plan. The migration plan presents a challenge to their sustainability. Broadcasters are particularly concerned at the absence of policy inquiry into the future needs of terrestrial broadcasting and its implication on business.  In a statement, etv’s Chief Executive Officer Marcel Golding says that given the significant impact such a plan would have on the business of free-to-air broadcasters, the channel expects the plan to be carefully developed.

The much desired 790MHz to 862MHz and 694MHz to 790MHz bands (termed Digital Dividend 1 and 2 respectively) are currently occupied by terrestrial broadcasting services. ICASA states that these bands will be vacated by 2015. Golding further stated that following analogue switch-off it must be guaranteed that at least one full DTT multiplex that will replicate the channel’s position in the analogue environment or be compensated for the loss of spectrum.

Without defined entitlements after analogue switch-off, broadcasters will be thrown into an environment where they are unable to explore additional services such as HD and 3D. This will impact on their ability to compete against TV-like services delivered over new technologies. The channel has also stated that it supports the release of a digital dividend as it understands that broadband and mobile telecommunications has an important role in South Africa’s development.  e.tv has made a recommendation to ICASA to consider making it clear that the rights of existing analogue broadcasters concerning the digital dividend will be considered at a later stage in a separate consultative process.

Issued by e.tv

 

Did you like this? Share it:

Radio and the digital migration

Posted by radio On November - 2 - 2012 ADD COMMENTS

By Abongile Zizi  

In a country nearing complete readiness for Digital Terestrial Television (DTT), the same transition for radio is still far off. This is because digital radio would only be a necessity if all analogue frequencies were full and no more FM stations could be licensed. It is a misconception that analogue radio will have to give way for a digital transition, the question then becomes, what does digital migration mean for radio?

South African radio audiences seem satisfied with the current AM and FM signals which are analogue and widely used for radio broadcasts. The obvious advantage that goes without stating is that with the digital migration more radio channels can be accommodated on the spectrum.  This gives room for radio to grow and diversify to cater to a variety of interests and audiences.  Radio stations are moving to using digital equipment in production but this does not translate to a readiness. Currently, ICASA is working on revising the Frequency Migration Plan for South Africa as the implementation of DTT has a notable influence on radio frequencies. Because of DTT, ICASA has to now efficiently plan how they allocate frequencies to radio communications. The regulator has already approved two digital technologies for digital radio in South Africa: Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) and Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM).

Debates around the type of technology to be implemented for a move to digital radio are pivotal in understanding what a possible radio migration would entail. Part of the appeal of radio is that unlike television, it is an exclusively audio based medium. Some digital radio standards allow for data streams to accompany the audio in the form of text with programme information and web-cam like pictures of DJ’s or advertising, this change the exclusively audio element of radio.

As a country far from an audio digital migration, it is fair to note that digital audio is being delivered to audiences through other mediums. In a paper titled “Challenges and perspectives of digital migration for African media, Professor Guy Burger, Director for Freedom of Expression and Media Development at UNESCO states; “Even if digital terrestrial broadcasts for radio do take root in African countries, eventually it is likely that audio will actually travel via a patchwork of technologies, such as satellite for remote areas, and cell phones for outdoor listening, while indoors would be via internet or even digital TV.”

It is an exciting time for the country with the strides we have made in relation to DTT and although digitised radio signals are still far off in terms of implementation, digital technology in the country is revolutionising radio from production to reception.

Did you like this? Share it:

In a nutshell: Radio growth and advertising

Posted by radio On September - 25 - 2012 ADD COMMENTS

By Helen Phushela

 

Radio is the most important medium in South Africa reaching over 88% of the population. Most people living in rural areas rely on it as a news and information source. Most stations that reach these areas are community radio stations that narrow down listenership and target market for advertisers into ethnic groups. An advertiser can produce an advert for a particular product which targets the right audience in their native language.

 

Advertising revenues increased in 2011 by 7.4%, which is lower than the 13.3% gained in 2010 a direct boost from the FIFA Soccer World Cup, according to research.

 

Radio, with its listenership covering 88% of the population, is still a dominant medium for broadcast advertising. The revenue increased by 7.1% on a compound annual rate from R3.2billion in 2011 to an estimated R4.6billion in 2016. Radio broadcast advertising as well as public funding revenue increased by 0.7% in 2011. Due to this, there has been a subsequent increase in television licence fee, which cross-subsidise the public radio station. With more and more households gaining access to television, public funding is projected at 1.5% increase compound annual rate to R480 million in 2016.

 

Radio consists of three segments namely public service broadcasting sector, commercial sector and community radio stations. Public broadcaster, SABC is state owned and funded through public licence fees and advertising. It operates public service stations in all of the official languages including Indian on Lotus FM and San on X-K FM.

 

Online radio streaming has allowed consumers to listen to their favourite programmes on the go. The frenzy to create applications for broadcasters has also taken the industry by storm. Jacaranda and 5Fm have their own apps, while other stations can be accessed on a group app such as TFS Radio. Radio programming is broadcast in all 11 official languages, as well as German, Hindi, Portuguese, Greek and Khoi-San languages.

 

Radio is the leading broadcasting medium in South Africa; Kwazulu Natal is the front-runner in radio listenership, claiming 20% of the total population. It is closely followed by Gauteng with 19% and Limpopo and Eastern Cape each at 13%. Regardless of the current RAMS for ethnic radio stations, radio shows produced in English remain dominant in South African radio taking up 41.1% of listenership in 2011. IsiZulu follows with 13.5% then Afrikaans at 9.3%.

 

Music however, still serves as a key ingredient to reaching and retaining audiences. Then there is phone in talk shows, current affairs and news programming.

 

Community radio stations claim more listeners as a collective with 8.5 million people tuning in each week – comprising of more than a quarter of the overall radio listening audience. Despite their reach, community radio stations still struggle to get advertising funding while some radio stations get subsidies from government or rely on community donations. The role of the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) is to ensure universal access, as well as to mediate disputes brought against licensees and regulate the industry. ICASA issued three invitations in February 2012 to provide commercial sound broadcasting in primary and secondary markets. Primary market, the authority, awarded two licenses in Gauteng, Durban and Cape Town. One license was awarded to Northern Cape and Eastern Cape, one in Free State.

 

Research by the South African Advertising Research Foundation (SAARF) showed a decline in the time spent listening to radio, a nine minute decline daily listenership as compared to the 1:33 minutes from the previous year. This took place when the weekly penetration declined by 0.1%. On the other hand, the Radio Advertising Bureau (RAB) promotes the use of radio as an advertising media. The focus is to educate the advertising community on the advantages of using radio as an advertising medium. Radio has launched online and is gradually migrating digitally, one can now comment on and follow the development of their favourite radio shows through social media tools such as Facebook pages and Twitter handle.

 

Branded content advertising, a relatively new form of advertising medium that blurs conventional distinctions between what constitutes advertising and what constitutes entertainment, will soon be integrated into programming. In the old days radio adverts were 30 seconds long and often left listeners perplexed. Advertisers in radio are now creating adverts that are more than a 30 seconds long. An example is FNB’s ‘Hello Steve’ campaign, which moved away from the traditional 30-second slot. According to reports, this campaign earned accolades throughout the industry and produced great results for FNB. Roles in adverts have now changed – the idea exists before a time period has been set.

 

Then there is the return of the jingle. Jingles and pneumatic trigger instant brand recognition in the hearts and minds of the listeners. These help brands build firm relationships with listeners and stand out from the media clutter. Radio with its online migration and popularity can now brand and promote products.

 

Another phenomenon is station-advertiser collaboration which, allows marketers the need to collaborate with stations, increasingly becoming content generators with the focus of entertaining and engaging listeners.

 

Power of personality is one of radio’s strengths which, lies in the personal relationship created between listeners and radio personalities. With the ever-expanding scope of radio presenters’ influence via social media platforms, we’ll see more brands matching themselves to a show or host.

 

More and more people are able to listen to their favourite show online and podcasts enable listeners to catch up on shows. Satellite radio is usually carried by a signal through the DStv’s audio bouquet however, not many people use this unconventional method of listening to radio.

 

Digital radio will allow radio to have sound quality of a CD and live streams of information on music played on shows will also allow the station to get information easily. In public funding there has been a 2% increase, from 442 million to 449 million in 2012. Radio stations such as Ja.fm, launched by Jacaranda FM, can only be connected to online and it serves an Afrikaans audience through a Listener Driven Radio application.

 

Wolrdtunes.net-All Hit is one of the radio stations which are music-orientated where listeners vote for songs and hit songs are played. Ballz Radio covers current affairs and news.

 

According to the South African Music Performance Rights Association (SAMRO), although radio has seen success over the years, it still faces the obstacles of paying 10% of its net broadcasting revenue to songwriters. The National Association of Broadcasters remains in dispute with this even after the recent judgement of 7% payable by stations passed by the Commission of Copyright at the Copyright tribunal.

 

South African broadcasters have to adhere to Constitutional laws since SA does not have established national media laws. This poses a problem to the regulation of broadcast media where the regulation rights that run broadcast media and different stations come from the Broadcasting Complains Commission of South Africa (BCCSA) and ICASA.

Did you like this? Share it:

The Department of Communications will be hosting the National Community Radio Governance Indaba in Polokwane, Limpopo Province from the 20 – 26 September 2012.

 

The main objective of the Indaba is to capacitate community radio stations on governance issues and promote adherence to corporate governance and regulatory compliance. The Indaba is part of an ongoing capacity building programme by the Department to empower stations to develop and implement corporate governance systems. Essential to this system are accountability and reporting to the communities that these stations exist to serve.

 

The last Indaba was hosted in 2007 in Durban and it focused on sustainability. This year’s theme is corporate governance as key to sustainability. In brief, no sustainability can be possible without a robust corporate governance culture. This is based on lessons learnt since 2007 that despite huge investment into the sector by the government, the sector is still wobbling owing mainly to governance challenges.

 

Over 200 delegates from the broader community radio sector are expected to attend, including the community radio stations, the regulator, Members of Parliament and sector bodies.

 

Details are as follows:
Date:    20 – 26 September 2012
Venue: Protea Hotel,
The Ranch, Polokwane,
Limpopo Province

 

To confirm attendance please contact Keitumetse Hlahatsi on Keitumetse@doc.gov.za or 0829223376.

 

For Media Enquiries please contact Busiswa Mlandu at Busiswa@doc.gov.za or on 0720706896.

 

Issued by:
Department of Communications
18 September 2012

 

Source: ICASA

Did you like this? Share it:

ICASA Rectifies City Press Report

Posted by radio On September - 14 - 2012 ADD COMMENTS

The Independent Communications Authority of SA (ICASA) would like to clarify a statement made on City Press of 09 September 2012 regarding the supposed intention to take the SABC to the Complaints and Compliance Committee (CCC) to defend its case of non-compliance following the report published by the Authority earlier this year and the one published by Media Monitoring Africa (MMA) recently. The Authority does not have any intention to take up the matter with the CCC.

 

Firstly, the Authority cannot comment on the validity of the MMA report nor can it corroborate SABC non-compliance as purported in that report. The reason for this is that the report was not commissioned by ICASA and the Authority is not aware of the type of methodology used to by MMA to conclude that the SABC is not complying with its licence conditions. Obviously, the period sampled is different from the period sampled by the Authority, so the results are likely to be different because of the different variables and methodologies involved.

 

Secondly, compliance by licensees is the most integral part and legislative mandate of ICASA. It is for this reason that the Authority published the 2009/10 SABC Compliance Report earlier this year. This is a sample measured over a 6 months period, and depended on the availability of resources to the Authority. The findings could therefore not be conclusive because the measurements did not cover the whole year as required.

 

Ordinarily, recurrence of non-compliance with the licence terms and conditions results in a licensee being referred to the Complaints and Compliance Committee for adjudication.

 

The SABC’s compliance is measured as a weekly average over a period of a year, and where an issue of non-compliance is identified, the licensee would then be given an opportunity to respond to the Authority’s findings.

 

Source: ICASA

Did you like this? Share it:

Digital Terrestrial Television Public Hearings

Posted by radio On September - 5 - 2012 ADD COMMENTS

The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) invites all interested stakeholders and the media to the public hearings regarding the eTV submission and presentation to the revised set of Draft Digital Terrestrial Television (DTT) regulations that have been published for a final round of public consultation.

 

The Authority would also like to inform all stakeholders that took part in the 21 – 23 August 2012 public hearings that it has decided to extend the date of their supplementary submissions within seven (7) days after the eTV’s presentation.

 

The purpose of conducting public hearings is to promote administrative justice in the development of regulations for the electronic communications sector.

 

There are two main changes to the regulations on which ICASA would particularly like to hear the views of the public. The Authority is proposing to use the second Mobile Digital Terrestrial Television multiplex as a third DTT multiplex during the dual illumination period to accommodate new entrants; and to stimulate the uptake of DTT services, foster content and enhance consumer choice.

 

This is in response to the Amended Broadcasting Digital Migration Policy of 17 February 2012 in which the Minister of Communications directs ICASA ‘to explore how best to introduce new services and licensees’ while ensuring that the digital migration process gives priority to incumbent broadcasters.

 

Secondly, the Authority is also proposing the formation of a Digital Television Content Advisory Group to advise on the most effective ways to ensure the supply of digital television content to encourage consumers to acquire set-top boxes in order to begin viewing digital television services.

 

The Authority has since received twenty (20) submissions from interested parties on the Draft DTT Regulations, seventeen (17) of which have indicated their willingness to make oral representations.

 

Date:      06 September 2012

Time:     10h00am

Venue:  Block C Presentation Room,
Pinmill Farm,
164 Katherine Street,
Sandton

 

For Enquiries contact:   Jubie Matlou – Sen Manager Communications and International Relations

Tel: 011 566 3455

Mobile: 082 376 0015

Email: jmatlou@icasa.org.za

Source: https://www.icasa.org.za/AboutUs/ICASANews/tabid/630/tag/Public%20Hearings/Default.aspx

Did you like this? Share it:

Who Owns Who on Mzansi’s Airwaves?

Posted by radio On August - 24 - 2012 2 COMMENTS

By Radiobiz

 

We all know that the State through the SABC owns three commercial radio stations (namely 5fm, Good Hope fm and Metro fm) and fifteen public service stations. But as to the rest of the commercial stations we don’t seem to know all the details as far as ownership and control are concerned. Lets unpack a few and see exactly who is controlling the information in the country through the airwaves.

 

Talk Radio 702, 567 Cape Talk, 94.5 Kfm and 94.7 Highveld Stereo are all owned by Primedia Broadcasting.  The ownership of these premium brands gives Primedia access to Gauteng, Eastern Cape and Western Cape. I guess KZN is the only primary market where they don’t have footprint however, they do syndicate broadcasting between 702 and 567 Cape Talk on a regular basis.

 

Hosken Consolidated Investments (HCI) owns 64% of 99.2 Yfm; they also own the same stake on eTV. This basically gives them a controlling interest in the radio station, thus HCI can influence the youth (mainly black) of Gauteng and the rest of the country through their media assets.

 

Kagiso Media has interests in quite a few stations across the country, they have minority stakes in KZN based Gagasi 99.5fm , Cape’s Heart 104.9 FM, Orange fm and an economic stake in Kaya FM. They are majority shareholders in Jacaranda FM and East Coast radio; this gives them access to both primary and secondary markets. Some might say the control of these private commercial stations is in the hands of the few, which could be a problem in the long run as far as diversity is concerned. We are hoping that ICASA would take note of this when deciding who to award the primary markets licences to commercial radio stations.

 

Kaya FM does not have a majority shareholder, alongside Kagiso Media there is Thebe Holdings, Shanike Investments, Kaya Investments and Mokgosi Holdings.

 

African Media Entertainment (AME) has a controlling interest in Orange FM of 70%, in Eastern Cape’s Algoa FM they have a 100% stake and 24.9% interest in Mpumalanga based M-Power FM. Orange FM has a footprint in five different provinces namely, Free State, North West, Northern Cape, northern KZN and southern Gauteng making it the regional station with the largest footprint in the country.

 

Up north, Limpopo based Capricorn FM is partly owned (37.5%) by MSG Africa Given Mkhari’s company, Safika Holdings and Limpopo based business people.

 

Makana Radio Communication (MRC) a company founded by former Robin Island political prisoners, they have controlling interests in Heart FM and iGagasi FM.

 

Radio North-west is owned by Direng Investments, SADTU Investment Company and other BEE company. Direng Investments and Mbombela Investments Holdings also have a stake in M-Power FM.

 

Classic FM doesn’t have a majority shareholder; it is owned by Liberty Life foundation, Ingoma Trust. Moneyweb Holdings and London-based Classic FM PLC.

 

Well now that you know, do you think the industry is diverse enough or more still needs to be done? Keeping in mind that there are more commercial radio licences still to be issued by ICASA.

Did you like this? Share it:

Icasa sets SA on path to 4G

Posted by admin On December - 18 - 2011 99 COMMENTS

The Independent Communications Authority of SA (Icasa) has begun the process of opening up so-called “high-demand spectrum bands” that will eventually pave the way to the introduction of fourth-generation (4G) mobile broadband networks in SA.

The authority has decided to tie spectrum allocations in the 2,6GHz and 800MHz bands and to offer access to frequencies in the lower of the two bands on a wholesale, open-access model, where operators share networks and compete at a retail level.

However, in a move that could prove highly contentious among operators, Icasa proposes that wholesale network providers be prohibited from also playing in the retail market and must provide services on a nondiscriminatory basis and allow any content, applications and services to flow over these networks.

It says it wants to move away from “traditional win-lose licensing methods and is considering using new licensing methods that encourage sharing, such as open-access models and ‘spectrum parks’ to maximise the number of new entrants in the sector”.

Under the “spectrum parks” model, Icasa wants to allow a number of entities to participate in sharing common spectrum on a self-managed basis.

By opening the spectrum to both incumbents and new operators, Icasa hopes to facilitate the introduction of new national and rural providers of broadband and other telecommunications services and to contribute to broad-based black economic empowerment. Applicants wishing to get access to the spectrum will need to have at least 30% of their equity in the hands of “historically disadvantaged individuals”. Among the incumbent operators, this puts Vodacom and Telkom in a tight spot, as they fail to meet this criterion.

Icasa had previously said it would license spectrum in the 2,6GHz and 3,5GHz bands, and deal with the 800MHz band — the so-called “digital dividend” currently used for analogue television broadcasts — at a later date. It has now decided to tie licensing of 800MHz and 2,6GHz and to put off the process of opening up 3,5GHz to a later date.

It is doing this, says Icasa councillor Marcia Socikwa, to “reflect alignment with international trends”. The 800MHz and 2,6GHz bands are proving popular frequencies worldwide for operators wanting to deploy next-generation broadband networks using a technology called long-term evolution (LTE). LTE networks will eventually lead to the introduction of 4G systems.

“The 800MHz band is a perfect candidate for wireless broadband access because it has excellent coverage characteristics and is highly suitable for rural coverage and will allow the authority to address government’s broadband policy, which aims to achieve universal broadband access by 2019,” says Socikwa. “Furthermore, it technically complements the 2,6GHz band.”

However, access to the 800MHz band will only be made available to telecoms operators once broadcasters have migrated from analogue to digital television, which is meant to happen by the end of 2013, a date the broadcasters feel can’t be met.

Under its plan, Icasa is dividing the 800MHz and 2,6GHz bands into linked blocks of spectrum. State-owned Sentech will be offered access to both bands in return for it giving up 20MHz of its existing allocation at 2,6GHz. Sentech will build a wholesale, open-access network using the frequency it is allocated.

To encourage new entrants, Icasa wants two of the paired blocks to be assigned to network licensees that currently have no spectrum allocated in designated bands used for cellular services. One paired block will be assigned to a network licensee to provide a network based on wholesale open-access conditions.

Spectrum has also been set aside for the “spectrum park”, but this will only be allocated at a later date, according to Icasa.

The authority has also proposed tough roll-out obligations. Those with access to both bands must provide 70% geographic coverage within five years, of which 50% must exclude Gauteng, Cape Town and Durban. Those with access to 2,6GHz only must provide 50% population coverage within four years.

Socikwa says Icasa wants to avoid having to auction spectrum, and adds this will only be done “as a last resort”. Where companies fail to use frequencies assigned to them, Icasa says it will “take steps to take back the spectrum”.

In a move that is certain to upset industry players, especially given the country is headed into the year-end holiday shutdown, Icasa has set a tight deadline of 31 January 2012 for interested parties to comment on the proposed plans. It expects to hold public hearings in the second week in February.  — Duncan McLeod,

Did you like this? Share it:

East Coast Radio unveils new drive show

East Coast Radio is excited to announce that East Coast Drive with Bongani and Mags will take over the airwaves every afternoon […]

POWER 98.7 hosts former President Mbeki to talk about his life

Former President Thabo Mbeki will, in a rare occasion, talk about his life and his work as part of a […]

RADIO 2000 spreads LOVE with the HOMELESS on Mandela Day

Radio 2000 will commemorate Mandela Day by devoting 67 minutes of community service to the homeless in Johannesburg CBD. Returning […]

SABC Radio to celebrate Mandela Day

SABC will celebrate Madiba Month under the theme, “Do Your Bit Of Good in Honour Of Madiba”.  Part of the […]


TAG CLOUD

POPULAR